Mickey Rooney died Sunday at his home in Studio City at age 93.

04/07/2014 1:54 pm0 commentsViews: 32

Mickey Rooney

HOLLYWOOD (CNS) – Funeral services were pending today for legendary
actor Mickey Rooney, one of the most famed child stars in history whose screen,

Mickey Rooney along side  Judy Garland.

Mickey Rooney along side
Judy Garland.

stage and television career spanned 10 decades.
Meanwhile, flowers will be placed on one of Rooney’s Hollywood Walk of
Fame stars in memory of the actor, who died Sunday at his home in Studio City
at age 93.
Rooney, a major box-office draw in the 1930s and ’40s who first appeared
on stage as a 17-month-old toddler in his parents’ vaudeville act, has four
stars on the Walk of Fame.
Rooney made one of his final public appearances in October at a 50th
anniversary screening of the comedy “It’s a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World” in
Hollywood. Karen Sharpe Kramer, wife of the film’s director, Stanley Kramer,
said she had never seen Rooney happier.
“Mickey was enthusiastic about life, like a young Andy Hardy,” she
said. “May he rest in peace. His legacy in show business will live on
forever.”
The colorful, 5-foot-3 Rooney, born Joseph Yule Jr. in New York City in
September 1920, had roles in such films as “A Family Affair,” “Boys Town,”
“Babes In Arms” and “National Velvet.”
Rooney came to Hollywood as a small child with his mother, Nell,
following his parents’ divorce.
Not long after arriving in Tinseltown, his mother arranged an audition
with cartoonist Fontaine Fox, who selected Rooney to play his comic-strip
character Mickey McGuire in a series of silent comedy film shorts.
Rooney starred in more than 70 episodes of the popular serial, which ran
until 1932.
His mother wanted to officially change her budding star’s name to Mickey
McGuire, but when Fox refused to allow it, she instead chose Mickey Rooney.
A contract with the Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer studio soon followed. His most
famous role — starting with “A Family Affair” — was Andy Hardy, son of
Judge James Hardy, in a 15-film series that was one of the most successful
ever.
By age 20, Rooney was earning $150,000 a year, a fortune for the time.

The versatile performer worked alongside such Hollywood luminaries as
Spencer Tracy, Judy Garland, Anthony Quinn, Jackie Gleason, Elizabeth Taylor
and Audrey Hepburn — with whom he appeared in the 1961 film classic,
“Breakfast at Tiffany’s.”
Rooney was nominated for four Academy Awards and received two special
Oscars, one in 1939, another in 1983 and two television Golden Globes in 1964
and 1981.
He also was nominated for a Tony Award in 1980 for his role in the
musical “Sugar Babies.
Rooney most recently appeared in the films “Night at the Museum” in
2006 and “The Muppets” in 2011.
Rooney — whose off-screen life made plenty of headlines — was married
eight times and fathered nine children. His first wife was actress Ava Gardner,
a fellow MGM star. He was legally separated from his most recent wife, Jan
Chamberlain, in June 2012, according to his official website.
Rooney filed for bankruptcy in 1962, making it public he had squandered
at least $12 million he amassed earlier in his career.
In recent years, he engaged in a contentious legal battle with his
stepson, Christopher Aber, against whom he filed an elder abuse and fraud
lawsuit in 2011 that included a restraining order being requested against Aber.
The order was not enforced when Aber agreed to keep his distance.
Rooney gave testimony about elder abuse before a U.S. Senate special
committee in March 2011.
Rooney is survived by Chamberlain; daughters Kelly Ann, Kerry, Kimmy Sue
and Jonelle; and sons Mickey Jr., Theodore, Michael, and Jimmy, who he
adopted from his marriage with Carolyn Hockett. Another of Rooney’s sons, Tim,
died in 2006.

   Eds: Flowers will be placed at 11 a.m. on Rooney’s star at 1718 Vine St.
Contact: Ana Martinez, (323) 468-1376.
HOLLYWOOD (CNS) – Funeral services were pending today for legendary
actor Mickey Rooney, one of the most famed child stars in history whose screen,
stage and television career spanned 10 decades.
Meanwhile, flowers will be placed on one of Rooney’s Hollywood Walk of
Fame stars in memory of the actor, who died Sunday at his home in Studio City
at age 93.
Rooney, a major box-office draw in the 1930s and ’40s who first appeared
on stage as a 17-month-old toddler in his parents’ vaudeville act, has four
stars on the Walk of Fame.
Rooney made one of his final public appearances in October at a 50th
anniversary screening of the comedy “It’s a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World” in
Hollywood. Karen Sharpe Kramer, wife of the film’s director, Stanley Kramer,
said she had never seen Rooney happier.
“Mickey was enthusiastic about life, like a young Andy Hardy,” she
said. “May he rest in peace. His legacy in show business will live on
forever.”
The colorful, 5-foot-3 Rooney, born Joseph Yule Jr. in New York City in
September 1920, had roles in such films as “A Family Affair,” “Boys Town,”
“Babes In Arms” and “National Velvet.”
Rooney came to Hollywood as a small child with his mother, Nell,
following his parents’ divorce.
Not long after arriving in Tinseltown, his mother arranged an audition
with cartoonist Fontaine Fox, who selected Rooney to play his comic-strip
character Mickey McGuire in a series of silent comedy film shorts.
Rooney starred in more than 70 episodes of the popular serial, which ran
until 1932.
His mother wanted to officially change her budding star’s name to Mickey
McGuire, but when Fox refused to allow it, she instead chose Mickey Rooney.
A contract with the Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer studio soon followed. His most
famous role — starting with “A Family Affair” — was Andy Hardy, son of
Judge James Hardy, in a 15-film series that was one of the most successful
ever.
By age 20, Rooney was earning $150,000 a year, a fortune for the time.

The versatile performer worked alongside such Hollywood luminaries as
Spencer Tracy, Judy Garland, Anthony Quinn, Jackie Gleason, Elizabeth Taylor
and Audrey Hepburn — with whom he appeared in the 1961 film classic,
“Breakfast at Tiffany’s.”
Rooney was nominated for four Academy Awards and received two special
Oscars, one in 1939, another in 1983 and two television Golden Globes in 1964
and 1981.
He also was nominated for a Tony Award in 1980 for his role in the
musical “Sugar Babies.
Rooney most recently appeared in the films “Night at the Museum” in
2006 and “The Muppets” in 2011.
Rooney — whose off-screen life made plenty of headlines — was married
eight times and fathered nine children. His first wife was actress Ava Gardner,
a fellow MGM star. He was legally separated from his most recent wife, Jan
Chamberlain, in June 2012, according to his official website.
Rooney filed for bankruptcy in 1962, making it public he had squandered
at least $12 million he amassed earlier in his career.
In recent years, he engaged in a contentious legal battle with his
stepson, Christopher Aber, against whom he filed an elder abuse and fraud
lawsuit in 2011 that included a restraining order being requested against Aber.
The order was not enforced when Aber agreed to keep his distance.
Rooney gave testimony about elder abuse before a U.S. Senate special
committee in March 2011.
Rooney is survived by Chamberlain; daughters Kelly Ann, Kerry, Kimmy Sue
and Jonelle; and sons Mickey Jr., Theodore, Michael, and Jimmy, who he
adopted from his marriage with Carolyn Hockett. Another of Rooney’s sons, Tim,
died in 2006.

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