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Starting in March 2016, Playboy Mags Will No Longer Feature Nude Photos

After 62 years of publishing nude women in its print and digital magazines, Playboy will no longer be featuring fully nude women in its photos, starting this coming spring.

As The New York Times reported, Playboy content editor Cory Jones visited Hugh Hefner at the Playboy Mansion last month to propose that the magazine should stop publishing photos of naked women — and Hefner, the founder of Playboy, agreed.

As the NYT said, Playboy was “a leader of the revolution that helped take sex in America from furtive to ubiquitous” — the problem now, however, is that the publication has become consumed by the industry which it created.

Scott Flanders, chief executive at Playboy, stated that pornography is so available these days, the magazine is no longer unique at this point. Consumers can instantly purchase provocative photos and videos online, and they can do so with relative anonymity — a luxury which the print magazine does not provide.

In fact, as Fortune stated, plenty of this material is already available for free; finding a nude picture is as simple as Googling the word “Paper,” thanks to reality star Kim Kardashian and her completely-naked photo shoot with PAPER magazine. While the porn business used to be incredibly lucrative for models, it’s not likely to contribute much revenue to the $500 billion that online stores are expected to bring in by 2018.

This material is perhaps so pervasive now that American consumers are just getting a bit sick of seeing it; Playboy actually began toning down its website and its social media posts earlier this year, according to USA Today.

After Playboy.com “re-launched sans nudity,” the magazine released a statement saying that “tens of millions of readers” go to the mobile app and the desktop website “every month for photos of beautiful women, but also for articles and videos from our humor, sex, and culture… sections.”

In a digital world where “NSFW” (“not suitable for work”) content is becoming more of a hassle to avoid online, more Millennials are getting tired of filtering their news feeds in the office, lest a rogue photo should pop up and lead to a sexual harassment case.

At this point, 18- to 30-somethings are avoiding websites like Playboy altogether; USA Today reported that around 5.6 million copies of Playboy were sold in 1975 when Marilyn Monroe graced the very first cover in 1953. In recent years, annual sales of the magazine have numbered around 800,000.

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